Where Do I Find the Time to Do What I Need to Do?

Some time ago, I was facing a day where I had typical responsibilities: study for sermons and Bible classes, memory, reading, and visiting.

I visited an older sister in the hospital who was having an operation the next day. She asked me to sit with her family during surgery.

There were two funerals I needed and wanted to attend connected with people in the congregation. But, unfortunately, they’d be going on at the same time as her operation.

How would I be able to do all this? I couldn’t!

How could I decide how to use the time, opportunities, and responsibilities I had?

Early the following day, as I awoke and thought about many things I had to do, the following prayer came to my mind:

Father, There are so many things that could be done today and a limited amount of time. Help me to do the most important things in an excellent way and willingly leave the others undone. Give me the wisdom and courage to choose and refuse. Give me the confidence and compassion to face the consequences. Give me grace to enjoy the benefits.

This prayer has become my philosophy of time management.

  • There are so many things that could be done today and a limited amount of time. This is true every day of my life. There are things to do in my family, work, recreation, spreading the gospel, benevolence, and then there’s eating and sleeping. I have more than 450 books in my Wish List on Amazon.com. I won’t be able to finish all those today. There’s just not enough time!
  • Help me to do the most important things in an excellent way and willingly leave the others undone. Here’s the key. What’s the most important thing for ME to do TODAY? After I’ve listed the most important things and identified the order in which I want to do them, will I feel good about my plan for the day or will I second-guess myself all day — wondering if I’m following the best plan? Will I willingly or reluctantly leave the other things undone?
  • Give me the wisdom and courage to choose and refuse. First, the wisdom. Since there are so many things to be done, how do I decide what’s most important? I like to begin with this prayer — then proceed to a ritual that helps me. Soon after rising, I look at my to-do list and arrange the tasks in the order I want to do them. Read this blog to see how I do this: How Do You Put 1st Things 1st and 2nd Things 2nd?. Second, courage. After I’ve decided the most important tasks for the day, I’m aware some people will not agree with my lists and the priorities I’ve given to the items on the list. Will I do what I’ve decided is most important or will I try to keep everybody else happy by doing what they want me to do? What if others don’t agree with each other? Whom will I follow? Do I realize for each task I decide to do, I’m refusing to do thousands of other things I could be doing at the same time?
  • Give me the confidence and compassion to face the consequences. Do I believe God will keep His promise of James 1:5? Will I have compassion for others who want me to violate my best wisdom?
  • Give me grace to enjoy the benefits. Since I don’t know a better way to use my time and have seen this plan be effective for many years, will I listen for the approval of the Master, “Well done, good and faithful servant”?

What are your suggestions for managing yourself with the time you have?

(Visited 205 times, 205 visits today)
Jerrie Barber
Disciple of Jesus, husband, grandfather, preacher, barefoot runner, ventriloquist

3 Responses to “Where Do I Find the Time to Do What I Need to Do?

  • Randy Medlin
    1 month ago

    So … which did you do? Sit with the family at the hospital or go to the funeral? Just asking…

    R. Medlin

    • Randy,

      When the sister made the request to sit with her family during surgery, I replied, “I will be checking with your family throughout the day tomorrow.”

      I visited before the first funeral, between the first and second funeral, and after the last funeral.

      Thankfully, the funeral home and hospital were close.

  • Bruce Ligon
    1 month ago

    I wholeheartedly agree with your thoughts. In seeking to do all the good we can, we must not fail to take care of our personal needs (spiritual, family, physical well being, etc.).

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