Preaching During the Interim…Church Problems

why do we have problems in the church? because we have people in the church

After nine sermons: two introductions and a series on discipleship from Luke 9:23, I preach a first principle sermon on Can We Make Progress by Going Backward?. Listen: Can We Make Progress by Going Backward?

The next Sunday, I start a series on How to Survive the Storm and Enjoy the Sunshine. These sermons discuss how to deal with problems in the church.

How to Survive the Storm and Enjoy the Sunshine

  1. Why Do We Have Problems in the Church and How Long Will They Exist? We have problems in the church because we have people in the church. How long will we have problems in the church? As long as we have people in the church. Listen to Storm 1 We have problems in the church because we have people in the church. Click To TweetHow long will we have problems in the church? As long as we have people in the church. Click To Tweet
  2. What Other Things Cause Problems in the Church? Jesus invites and attracts open, habitual, active sinners. When they accept His invitation to follow, they bring problems with them. Old attitudes and habits don’t disappear instantly. Jews wanted to continue to observe and bind circumcision and the law of Moses. Some people are slow learners. It took at least three tries for Peter to understand the unity of Jews and Gentiles. When we invite and embrace “whosoever will,” the whosoevers bring their problems with them. The problem in many churches is they don’t have enough problems. They screen out undesirables and only accept people who are like them and those they like. This isn’t the invitation of Jesus. Listen to Storm 2
  3. What are Some Situations that May Precede Greater Problems? Many things happened between the church “having favor with all the people” and the first church conflict in Acts 6. Acts 2 begins with a different Pentecost. A new age was coming. People were in Jerusalem from different backgrounds. There was a radical change for some of the converts. They converted from “Let Him be crucified…His blood be on us and on our children” to “Men and brethren, what shall we do?”. Lingering visitors placed a strain on finances and hospitality that lead to radical fund-raising. The rapid growth—3,000, daily additions, 5,000 men, believers increasingly added, the numbers of the disciples was multiplying—brought opportunity for more problems. Growing churches where I’ve worked experienced increased problems. Acts 4 brings a new issue: opposition from outside the church. The apostles were arrested and imprisoned. Acts 5 tells of a sin problem within the Jerusalem church. Acts 6 opens with conflict. Listen to Storm 3
  4. How Can Good Communication Help Solve Problems? My beginning assumption is the apostles were good leaders. Jesus selected them, taught them, and trained them. Their resumé was adequate. When complaint came, they listened. There was a conflict between the Grecian group and the Hebrew group. We have groups in our congregations: rich-poor, young-old, black-white-brown-yellow, country-city, Democrat-Republican-Independent, your family-my family. Their differences are sometimes bases for conflict. The apostles listened to the murmuring, complaint, quarrel. This isn’t good communication. But the widows were being neglected. The apostles didn’t wait until everyone passed a New and Improved Communication Class before they moved to help widows. All communication should be heard, evaluated, and an appropriate response given. Listen to Storm 4
  5. Why Am I Often Disappointed in Leaders? People disappointed in their leaders doesn’t necessarily indicate the leaders are inadequate. Even the best leaders have limitations and blind spots. The apostles were good leaders. However, widows were neglected. Even the best leaders cannot do everything that should be done in a growing church. The apostles essentially said, “We’re not going to the grocery store.” The benevolent work was good. They weren’t the ones to do it. Good leaders won’t be pressured into doing a thousand other tasks because of guilt or fear of losing leadership. Listen to Storm 5 Even the best leaders have limitations and blind spots Click To TweetEven the best leaders cannot do everything that should be done in a growing church. Click To Tweet
  6. How Many People Should Be Involved in Solving Problems? Good leaders don’t assume responsibility belonging to the group in solving group problems, but they help and lead the group in a solution. The apostles’ response: we won’t neglect our responsibility in the ministry of the word and prayer to put out brush fires; you select seven men to lead this effort; we’ll appoint them. They’ll do the work. Listen to Storm 6
  7. How Can Trust Grow Between Leaders and Followers? Sometimes the congregation doesn’t trust the elders and the elders don’t trust the congregation. Both have good examples and reasons. If you don’t believe it, ask them, and they’ll tell you. Someone has to start the trust risk. When people are commissioned to become part of the solution instead of a burden and a problem, they’ll be happy. The multitude was pleased (Acts 6:5). Greeks were neglected. They chose Greeks to correct the problem. The group selected seven men. The seven men the group selected, the apostles appointed. Listen to Storm 7

The church grew. Those responsible for the mission of the church didn’t leave their chief tasks to do other things. If the apostles had left their work to serve tables, the word couldn’t have spread as it did. When elders (parents) do the work of deacons (children), and deacons (children) make policy decisions elders (parents) should make, there’ll be unnecessary conflict and stagnation instead of growth. Each member of the body is to function in his or her place.

Acts 6:1-7 is a good example of God’s leaders dealing with conflict in a healthy way.

What have you found helpful in dealing with conflict in a congregation?

Please leave a comment by ...... clicking here.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

Please comment

2 thoughts on “Preaching During the Interim…Church Problems

  1. I have the CD set “How to Survive the Storm” and have listened to it at least a half dozen times, or more. It is rich with wisdom – not just for members whose congregations are between preachers or experiencing hard times. Good stuff brother Barber